Father says he was nursing son to sleep moments before tornado hit Glenmary subdivision

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Those in the hard-hit neighborhood of Glenmary are rebuilding following the EF-1 tornado that ripped through the Fern Creek area. One of those who went out on Thursday, picking up what they could, was Ryan Murley. He tells WLKY that he was breastfeeding his 5-month-old son in the moments before the tornado hit. “It’s hard to even understand what’s going on,” Murley said. “You’re just trying to get to a safe place. Everything was calm, I was rocking the baby to sleep in the crib and I got a warning on my phone of severe thunderstorms and high winds and I just left it and it’s not a big probably and then probably 30 seconds later a minute later I start to hear the winds whipping outside what viewers saw as severe storms, tornadoes swept through Kentucky “I just grabbed the baby, I started moving,” Murley said. “And then the whole house shook. I thought a tree had fallen on the house. But as soon as I enter the hallway, the insulation spins around in the house. It was like a snowstorm in there and my wife is screaming from the bedroom and she was where the roof came off.” Murley said the family hunkered down in the stairwell. With the Thursday morning, the damage to the house was understood.The roof of their room was torn off, the windows on the first floor of the house were blown out, but the baby’s room was virtually intact.Others in neighborhood with little to no damage have taken the opportunity to help out however they can,” Murley said. “If you need anything, everyone says, ‘I’ll get you some food, I’ll get you something to drink. Do you need trash bags? What do you want us to do. 20 years old, but feels closer to his neighbors than ever before.” And through the another, by helping each other, we will all get through this. It’s amazing how we all came together and helped each other. Everyone is ready to step in if anyone needs anything and none of us have the power, but we” Murley said he was grateful for people like Renberger helping out on Thursday and grateful that he and his family are doing well. Murley explained, however, that they have learned one thing – who is the strongest sleeper in their home. Their 5-month-old son. “He hasn’t even moved,” said Murley said “He slept through the whole experience. And it’s kind of ironic because I couldn’t get him to sleep and then one time it only takes a tornado to knock a baby down I guess.” affected areas. A map of LG&E outages -KU showed more than 3,400 homes still without power as of 11 p.m. Thursday night.

Those in the hard-hit neighborhood of Glenmary are rebuilding following the EF-1 tornado that ripped through the Fern Creek area.

One of those who went out on Thursday, picking up what they could, was Ryan Murley. He tells WLKY that he was breastfeeding his 5-month-old son in the moments before the tornado hit.

“It’s hard to even understand what’s going on,” Murley said. “You’re just trying to get to a safe place. Everything was calm, I was rocking the baby to sleep in the crib and I got a warning on my phone of severe thunderstorms and high winds and I just left it and it’s not a big probably and then probably 30 seconds later, a minute later I start to hear the winds whipping outside.”

The winds, he said, were followed by a crack, then he said he felt the pressure in the house drop.

PICTURES: What viewers saw as severe storms, tornadoes ripped through Kentucky

“I just grabbed the baby, started moving,” Murley said. “And then the whole house shook. I thought a tree had fallen on the house. But as soon as I walk into the hallway, the insulation spins around in the house. snow in there and my wife is screaming from the bedroom and she was where the roof came off.”

Murley said the family hunkered down in the stairwell. With daylight on Thursday morning, we understood the damage caused to the house. The roof of their room was torn off, the windows on the first floor of the house were blown out, but the baby’s room was virtually intact.

Others in the neighborhood with little to no damage took the opportunity to help.

“Everyone helps out as much as they can,” Murley said. “If you need anything, everyone says, ‘I’ll get you some food, I’ll get you something to drink. Do you need trash bags? What do you want? we do.'”

Michele Renberger said she had lived in the neighborhood for 20 years but felt closer to her neighbors than ever before.

Four tornadoes: At least 4 tornadoes confirmed by storms that passed through the Louisville area

“We take things for granted and forget what it’s like to have no power,” Renberger said. “And through each other, helping each other, we’re all going to get through this. It’s amazing how we’ve all come together and helped each other. Everyone is ready to step in if someone has need anything and neither of us has the power, but we help each other through.”

Murley said he was grateful for people like Renberger helping out on Thursday and grateful that he and his family are doing well.

Murley explained, however, that they learned one thing: who was the strongest sleeper in their house. Their 5 month old son.

“He didn’t even move,” Murley said. “He slept through the whole experience. And it’s kind of ironic because I couldn’t put him to sleep and then one time it only takes a tornado to put a baby down I guess.”

Electricity crews are working to restore power to affected areas. An LG & E-KU outage map showed more than 3,400 homes still without power as of 11 p.m. Thursday night.


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