Hurricane Ida removed from the list of hurricane names

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  • Ida killed dozens of people and caused an estimated $75 billion in damage as it ravaged the United States last year.
  • This year’s Atlantic hurricane season officially begins on June 1 – with Ana.
  • A total of 94 hurricane names have now been retired.

There will never be another Hurricane Ida.

the World Meteorological Organization The WMO Hurricane Committee (WMO) removed Ida from its rotating list of Atlantic storm names due to the death and destruction caused by the Category 4 hurricane in 2021.

Overall, Ida killed dozens of people and caused an estimated $75 billion in damage as it ravaged the United States last year.

It was the fifth costliest storm in US history, behind hurricanes Katrina, Harvey, Maria and Sandy, all of which retired.

Imani will instead be used in future lists of names, which repeat every six years, unless a storm is so deadly that her name is removed – as in the case of Ida.

It has been a difficult five years for the United States with the strongest hurricanes.

“We had more Category 4 and Category 5 landfalls in the United States from 2017 to 2021 than from 1963 to 2016,” said National Hurricane Center director Ken Graham, chairman of the WMO committee. , in a press release.

The WMO reuses storm names every six years in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific basin lists. The nation hardest hit by a storm can request that its name be removed because the storm was so deadly or costly that future use of the name would be insensitive.

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The deletion also avoids confusion caused by a future storm with the same name. In 2005, five Storm names, including Katrina, were retired – most for a single season.

This year’s Atlantic hurricane season officially begins on June 1 – with Ana.

A total of 94 hurricane names have now been retired. When a storm name is removed from the list of Atlantic names, member countries of that region’s meteorological organization select a new name. For Atlantic storms, the name may be French, Spanish, or English, reflecting the languages ​​of residents of countries likely to be affected by a hurricane.

In 1953 the United States began using female names for hurricanes, and in 1979 both male and female names were used. The nouns alternate masculine and feminine.

There are no Q, U, X, Y, or Z names due to the lack of usable names beginning with those letters.

Contribute: The Associated Press


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