National Weather Service Hurricane Preparedness Week: Day 3, Hurricane Winds

0

[ad_1]

ARE YOU READY FOR HURRICANE SEASON?

The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale was created in 1971 by Herbert Saffir and Robert Simpson to classify hurricanes based on their wind speed. (NWS picture)

BREVARD COUNTY • MELBOURNE, FLORIDA – The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale was created in 1971 by Herbert Saffir and Robert Simpson to classify hurricanes based on their wind speed.

Similar scales are also used in the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean.

Hurricanes are ranked on a scale of 1 to 5 based on maximum sustained surface wind speed, which is defined as the maximum one-minute wind at a clear height of 33 feet. However, a storm’s gusts can be much higher than its sustained speed.

If a hurricane reachesAt wind speeds that correspond to categories 3, 4 and 5 on the scale, they are considered “major hurricanes”.

Once a storm reaches a certain category, it is always known by that category for historical purposes, regardless of its intensity upon landing.

On average, there are 6 hurricanes developing in the Atlantic Ocean each season, with three of them becoming major hurricanes.

[ad_2]
Source link

Share.

Comments are closed.