Superintendent Moore reflects on lives lost in May 2013 tornado

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ONE OF THE THINGS WE WERE ALSO HYPER FOCUSED ON WAS THAT WE WILL NEVER FORGET SOMEBODY GOING ON THE PLAZA AT THE FRONT OF THIS BUILDING IF THEY DON’T KNOW WHAT HAPPENED BEFORE LEAVING THEY WILL KNOW WHO YOU TAKE THIS AND LET IT NOT DEFINE MORE PUBLIC SCHOOLS BUT ALSO THE HORNOHE T MEMORY OF THESE CHILDREN HE HAS SOMETHING DEFINED US MUST BE COMPLETELY HONEST WITH YOU. MIEAN, WE ARE NOT KNOWN FOR OUR RESILIENCE. I’M NOT I’M SAYING YOU KNOW, THERE IS A LOT THAT THIS COMMUNITY HAS TO ENDURE AND WORK THROUGH AND I AM ONE OF THOSE PEOPLE. THE THING YOU KNOW WHERE MY SLEEPLESS NIGHTS CAME FROM FMRO WAS THE ETH FACT YOU KNOW WE LOST THE SEVEN CHILDREN AND IT WAS ON MY WATCH. I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SIT DOWN AND VISIT ONE OF OUR RELATIVES AT AN EVENT EARLIER THIS WEEK. AND I ALWAYS MAKE THIS DAY WHEN I MEET THEM OR TALK I WANT MY HEART TO BREAK. YOU KNOW, I KNOW YOU, AND I HAVE DEALED WITH WHAT I CONSIDER AS SURVIVOR’S GUILT. I mean, I have two daughters myself. AND TONIGHT, EARLY NEXT MORNING. I HAVE TO GET HOME AND I WAS ABLE TO SEE ASHTON AND AVERY ROW LINES. WHAT? STRONGER MEANS TO YOU PERSONALLY WHEN YOU SEE THIS OR THAT HASHTAG, WHAT DOES IT MEAN? IT NEVER FAIL THIS COMMUNITY ALWAYS SETTLES AND ANDAK T CARE FOR EACH OTHER AND I’M JUST TELL YOU THE 2013. AND THE CROSS COUNTRY AT THE TRAGEDY WE HAVE TREATED THERE IS NO CHOICE BUT WE COULD HAVE RETAINED AND DO WHAT WEEE NDED TO DO WITHOUT THE COMMUNITY SUPPORTING PARENTS WHO LTOUR CHILDREN. YES INVITED TO COME TO GRADUATION WE HAVE SOME VERY BEAUTIFUL SYMBOLIC THINGS WE WILL BE DOING DURING THIS, YOU KNOW DURING GRADUATION EXERCISE SO KNOW ME AND IT WILL BE HARD FOR THEM TO BE THERE. I AM REALLY HONORED AND HAPPY THAT THEY COME AND IT MEANS SOMETHING T

‘It was on my watch’: Superintendent Moore reflects on kids lost in May 2013 tornado who would graduate

Parents who have lost their children are welcome, but Superintendent Robert Romines understands how difficult it will be

It’s been almost nine years since the last EF5 tornado in the United States. It was May 20, 2013, in Moore. Twenty-five people died that day, including seven children. >> Previous cover: Survivor of 2013 deadly Moore tornado remembers that terrible day. This year’s anniversary is a somber one, as the seniors of Moore High School prepare to graduate, knowing their seven classmates won’t. Moore Superintendent Robert Romines spoke with KOCO 5 about the emotional week ahead. “One of the things that we were also hyper-focused on was that we would never forget,” Romines said, “and whoever walks up into the plaza, the facade of this building, if they don’t know what’s going on passed, before they leave, they’ll find out.”How does the district honor the memory of children without letting tragedy define Moore Schools?>> Related Coverage: Moore Schools Plans to Honor Seven Students Killed in Plaza Towers “It’s done define us a bit and to be completely honest with you, I mean, we’re known for our resilience,” Romines said. “I’m not going to lie to you. There’s, you know, there’s a lot that this community has to endure and go through and I’m one of those people.” He continued. “The thing you know, where did my sleepless nights come from, it was the fact that you know, we lost the seven kids and it was on my watch,” he said. “I had the opportunity to sit down and visit one of our parents at an event earlier this week. And I would do so again to this day, when I meet them or talk , I mean my heart is breaking, you know, I’ve had, you know, and I’ve been dealing with a bit, I consider some survivor guilt, I mean, I myself have two girls. And that night or early the next morning, I have to go home and I got to see Ashton and Avery Romines. “What does Moore Strong mean to the superintendent personally? >> From the archives: the director of the Plaza Towers Elementary School tells the story of a tornado, “It never fails. This community always pulls together and cares for each other. And I’m just telling you that the tragedy of 2013 and cross-country that we have experienced, there is no way we could have picked ourselves up and done what we need to do without the support of the community,” he said. Parents who have lost their children are welcome to attend the graduation, but Romines understands if they find it too difficult. symbolic things that we’re going to do during this, you know, during the graduation exercise, so, you know, I, it’s going to be hard for them to be there. I’m really honored and happy that they’re coming. It means something to me,” he said.

It’s been almost nine years since the last EF5 tornado in the United States.

It was May 20, 2013, in Moore.

Twenty-five people died that day, including seven children.

>> Previous cover: A survivor of the deadly Moore tornado in 2013 remembers that terrible day

This year’s anniversary is a bleak one, as the seniors of Moore High School prepare to graduate, knowing their seven classmates won’t.

Moore Superintendent Robert Romines spoke with KOCO 5 about the emotional week ahead.

“One of the things that we were also hyper-focused on was that we would never forget,” Romines said, “and whoever walks up into the plaza, the facade of this building, if they don’t know what’s going on has passed, before they leave they will know.”

How does the district honor the memory of children without letting tragedy define Moore Schools?

>> Associated coverage: Moore Schools plans to honor seven students killed at Plaza Towers

“It kind of defined us and to be completely honest with you, I mean, we’re known for our resilience,” Romines said. “I’m not going to lie to you. There’s, you know, there’s a lot that this community has to endure and go through and I’m one of those people.”

He continued.

“The thing that you know where my sleepless nights are coming from is the fact that you know, we lost the seven kids and it was on my watch,” he said. “I had the opportunity to sit down and visit one of our parents at an event earlier this week. And I would do so again to this day, when I meet them or talk , I mean my heart is breaking, you know, I’ve had, you know, and I’ve been dealing with a bit, I consider some survivor guilt, I mean, I myself have two girls. And that night or early the next morning, I have to go home and I got to see Ashton and Avery Romines.”

What does Moore Strong mean to the superintendent personally?

>> Extract from the archives: Principal of Plaza Towers Elementary School Tells Story of Tornado

“It never fails. This community always steps up and takes care of each other. And I’m just telling you the tragedy of 2013 and cross-country that we faced, there’s no way we’re going to could have picked ourselves up and done what we needed to do without the support of the community,” he said.

As for parents who have lost their children, they are welcome to attend the graduation, but Romines understands if they find it too difficult.

“We have some really nice symbolic things that we’re going to do during this, you know, during the graduation exercise, so, you know, I, it’s, it’s going to be hard for them to be there. I “I’m really honored and happy that they’re coming. It means something to me,” he said.


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