Tornado landed in San Joaquin County, according to the National Weather Service

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A “weak tornado” briefly touched down in a field near Isleton in San Joaquin County on Thursday afternoon, the Sacramento National Weather Service said. The NWS said Friday it received video of the tornado from a trained weather observer and according to a preliminary determination the tornado was less than 50 feet wide and touched down for less than a minute. At approximately 12:20 p.m., the tornado touched down in a field about 8 miles east-southeast of Isleton with no nearby structures. The location was also about 4.5 miles west of Interstate 5 and south of Highway 12. Its path stretched less than 100 feet. The woman who filmed the video said she grew up in the Midwest with lots of tornadoes there, but was surprised to see a tornado in California. “I kept guessing myself. Even though I’m a trained observer, I grew up in the Midwest, I’m very knowledgeable about tornadoes I was still, no way was that going to happen,” Sarah Sears said. at KCRA. 3. “Mostly because it wasn’t fully connected from cloud to ground, I was a bit unsure.” Because there is no evidence the tornado damaged any structure or caused any injuries, the NWS said it would not send a damage crew to the area. There was no tornado warning in effect at the time, but the NWS said it warned of severe thunderstorms. Video of the tornado was sent to the NWS “well after the event” and “small, brief, weak tornadoes are very difficult to detect using radar”, unlike larger, destructive tornadoes. KCRA 3 viewers sent in several videos of funnel clouds in the area during Thursday’s stormy conditions. A funnel cloud is a rotating cloud that does not contact the ground and does not cause damage. A tornado occurs when such rotation of air comes into contact with the ground. Funnel clouds can occur frequently under conditions like Thursday in Northern California. In rare situations, funnel clouds can become tornadoes. If this happens, you must seek shelter immediately. The NWS issued a tornado warning late Thursday afternoon for parts of San Joaquin, Calaveras, Amador and Stanislaus counties.

A “weak tornado” briefly touched down in a field near Isleton in San Joaquin County on Thursday afternoon, the Sacramento National Weather Service said.

The NWS said on Friday it received video of the tornado from a trained weather observer and according to a preliminary determination the tornado was less than 50 feet wide and touched down for less than a minute.

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At approximately 12:20 p.m., the tornado touched down in a field about 8 miles east-southeast of Isleton with no nearby structures. The location was also about 4.5 miles west of Interstate 5 and south of Highway 12. Its path stretched less than 100 feet.

The woman who filmed the video said she grew up in the Midwest with lots of tornadoes there, but was surprised to see a tornado in California.

“I kept guessing myself. Even though I’m a trained observer, I grew up in the Midwest, I’m very knowledgeable about tornadoes I was still, no way was that going to happen,” Sarah Sears said. at KCRA. 3. “Mostly because it wasn’t fully connected from cloud to ground, I was a bit unsure.”

Because there is no evidence the tornado damaged any structure or caused any injuries, the NWS said it would not send a damage crew to the area.

There was no tornado warning in effect at the time, but the NWS said it warned of severe thunderstorms.

KCRA

Here is a view of the radar at the time.

Video of the tornado was sent to the NWS “well after the event” and “small, brief, weak tornadoes are very difficult to detect using radar”, unlike larger, destructive tornadoes.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

KCRA 3 viewers sent in several videos of funnel clouds in the area during Thursday’s stormy conditions.

A funnel cloud is a rotating cloud that does not contact the ground and does not cause damage. A tornado occurs when such rotation of air comes into contact with the ground.

Funnel clouds can occur frequently under conditions like Thursday in Northern California.

In rare situations, funnel clouds can become tornadoes. If this happens, you should immediately take cover.

The NWS issued a tornado warning late Thursday afternoon for parts of San Joaquin, Calaveras, Amador and Stanislaus counties.



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