Tropical depression could form the next day or the day in the Caribbean, say hurricane forecasters | Hurricane Center

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A tropical depression is likely to form within a day or two in the Caribbean, hurricane forecasters said Thursday.

Early forecasts from the National Hurricane Center show the system, currently called Invest 91L, heading towards Nicaragua and Honduras.

If it becomes a tropical storm, the next available name is Julia.

Meanwhile, a tropical depression in the Atlantic is expected to begin to weaken soon. It does not pose a threat to the earth.

Related: 60+ non-perishable items to consider for your emergency kit

Here’s the latest from the National Hurricane Center as of 7 a.m. Thursday.

Expected reinforcement






image via National Hurricane Center


A disturbance in the Caribbean Sea is likely to develop into a tropical depression within a day or two, forecasters said.

At 7 a.m., the low pressure system was over the southeastern Caribbean, just off the coast of Venezuela. It was producing “a wide area” of showers and thunderstorms over the Windward Islands and parts of South America.

It is expected to interact with land along the northern coast of South America, which could hamper “meaningful development”, forecasters said. However, the system is moving west at 15 mph and conditions for development are more favorable once it comes back over water.

It has an 80% chance of becoming a tropical depression within 48 hours.

Further strengthening is expected as the system moves westward toward Central America Friday through Sunday, forecasters said.

Regardless of development, heavy rain and gusty winds are possible over parts of the Windward Islands, ABC Islands and parts of South America.

The shaded area on the graph is where a storm could develop and is not a trajectory. The National Hurricane Center issues a track when a tropical depression is forming or about to form.

The categories, in ascending order of strength, are tropical depression, tropical storm, and hurricane (categories 1 through 5).

Read the full outlook.

Atlantic depression







Tropical depression in the Atlantic 4 a.m. track on October 6

image via National Hurricane Center


A tropical depression in the Atlantic is expected to weaken soon and become a residual low the next day, forecasters said.

At 4 a.m., the low was about 635 miles northwest of the Cape Verde Islands and moving northwest at 13 mph.

It has winds of 35 mph.

No watch or warning is indeed linked to the storm.

Read the full review.

Busiest time of the season

This is historically the busiest time of Atlantic hurricane season.

For the past 100 years, the tropics have been most active in August, September and October, with September 10 being the peak of the season, according to federal forecasters. About 80% of the systems that hit the Gulf Coast formed during this time, according to the National Weather Service in Slidell.







High hurricane season

For the past 100 years, the tropics have been most active in August, September and October, with Sept. 10 being the peak of Atlantic hurricane season, according to federal forecasters. (graphic via NOAA)


So far there have been nine named storms this season – Alex, Bonnie, Colin, Danielle, Earl, Fiona, Gaston, Hermine and Ian. The next available name is Julia.

Hurricane season ends on November 30, but storms can form at any time.

Storm categories

On the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, the wind categories are:

  • Tropical depression – less than 39 mph
  • Tropical Storm – 39 to 73 mph
  • Category 1 Hurricane – 74 to 95 mph
  • Category 2 Hurricane – 96 to 110 mph
  • Category 3 hurricane – 111 to 129 mph
  • Category 4 Hurricane – 130-156 mph
  • Category 5 Hurricane – 157 mph and above

What to do now

Now is the time to review hurricane plans and ensure your property is prepared for any storm threat. Here are some tips from the National Weather Service:

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